Monthly Archives: April 2018

The Problem With Our Phones

The Problem With Our Phones

They are hugely useful of course but in many ways, we buy the advantages our phones give us at a subtly high price we don’t entirely recognise. Some reflections on how to live well around phones. […]

CREDITS

Produced in collaboration with:

Tom Kemp
https://vimeo.com/user26596912

I Was A Skeptic Of Mindfulness … Until I Tried To Make My Case

I Was A Skeptic Of Mindfulness … Until I Tried To Make My Case

Our science staff is trying to lead a more scientific life in 2018. Throughout the week, we’ve been questioning whether some of our habits and hobbies are based on junk science or real evidence. Here’s the fourth entry, on the merits of mindfulness. Since this is FiveThirtyEight, I feel […]

But as FiveThirtyEight’s science team assembled the junk science we wanted to shed in 2018, I started to wonder whether mindfulness really was bunk. So I dove into the scientific literature and discovered I was wrong: There is some limited evidence to suggest that meditation might help with some ailments and may produce measurable changes in the brain. It’s no miracle cure, and there’s still a lot of science left to do, especially about the kind of casual meditation people may fit into a busy day. But in my rush to doubt my therapist’s advice, I forgot that skepticism can sometimes be as flawed as the science it seeks to temper. […]

The surprising thing Google learned about its employees — and what it means for today’s students

The surprising thing Google learned about its employees — and what it means for today’s students

The conventional wisdom about 21st century skills holds that students need to master the STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — and learn to code as well because that’s where the jobs are. It turns out that is a gross simplification of what students need to know […]

This post explains what Google learned about its employees, and what that means for students across the country. It was written by Cathy N. Davidson, founding director of the Futures Initiative and a professor in the doctoral program in English at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and author of the new book, “The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World in Flux.” She also serves on the Mozilla Foundation board of directors, and was appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Council on the Humanities. […]

Student Success Vs. Teaching Effectiveness

Student Success Vs. Teaching Effectiveness

Student Success Vs. Teaching Effectiveness How Much of a Students Success Comes From their Teachers? Student successfulness is one of the most important metrics to measure the overall efficiency in education. Teachers, principals, programs, schools, and universities are all evaluated by looking at how many students drop out and […]

Student success is also one of the main drivers behind the whole economic system of universities. Less successful students equal less grants to the institution. This system acts as a powerful incentive for institutions to provide resources that effectively help students succeed.
Basically, what institutions want is graduating students to be extremely competitive compared to other institutions and an attractive match for employees. But loosing too many along the way would be disastrous […]