Monthly Archives: February 2015

2020 Vision: Outlook for online learning in 2014 and way beyond | Tony Bates

by Tony Bates

Taking the long view

Doug Saunders in the Globe and Mail on  January 4 wrote an interesting piece on prediction, entitled: “Gadgets alone don’t make the future.” Having shown how amazingly accurate technologists in 1961 were in predicting what technologies would roll out in the future, he also showed how poorly they predicted how these gadgets would impact on our lives. In summary:

‘We are very good at guessing where our inventions might lead. We are very poor in understanding how humans might change their lives….the decision of what kind of life to live between the screens remains a political one, shaped not by our inventions but by our own decisions.’

– See more at: http://www.tonybates.ca/2014/01/12/2020-vision-outlook-for-online-learning-in-2014-and-way-beyond/#sthash.3dHGS4zI.dpuf

It’s Here! The NMC Horizon Report > 2015 HiEd Edition

The NMC and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) are jointly releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2015 Higher Education Edition in a special session at the 2015 ELI Annual Meeting. The 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe […]

Mobile pedagogy for English language teaching: a guide for teachers by Agnes Kukulska-Hulme, Lucy Norris and Jim Donohue

Contents
1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
2. About the project…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3
3. Acknowledgements……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..4
4. Opening address to teachers……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5
5. A framework for mobile assisted language teaching and learning………………………………………………………..7
6. How does the framework relate to a lesson? …………………………………………………………………………………………10
7. Ways to implement mobile pedagogy………………………………………………………………………………………………………13
8. Caution: some important considerations………………………………………………………………………………………………..22
9. Further practical lesson and home learning ideas…………………………………………………………………………………26
10. Further resources, apps and links………………………………………………………………………………………………………….34
Glossary…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..38
References………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………40
Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………41

 

Introduction
This guide responds to an identified desire among English language teachers to make sense of the rising tide of possibilities created by mobile language
learning (also known as mobile assisted language learning or MALL).
The ideas in this guide are based on a research project conducted at The Open University in 2013–14, funded by a grant from The British Council Research Partnerships scheme. This project has investigated the experiences of English language learners and teachers who have explored mobile learning to some degree, even if only tentatively and informally. Recognising that we live in an increasingly
mobile world, where travel and migration are more common and mobile devices are a part of everyday life, the research has focused particularly on the teaching and learning context of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Teachers already know many of the ingredients that
can spell success for language learning and this naturally leads to consideration of how language teaching might be enhanced by the careful use of mobile devices. In this guide we propose a new frame of reference designed to stimulate thinking around key aspects of mobile-enabled language learning activities for students. One of the key aspects of successful mobile learning of English that the framework highlights is the use of activities which exploit a dynamic language and technology
environment while drawing on the distinctive capabilities of teachers and learners.
It is our hope that this guide will be read widely and adopted in teacher development throughout the world. We look forward to receiving feedback on
whether it has enabled teachers and learners to rethink and revitalise their practices. […]